Wednesday, 24 December 2014
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Am I right in saying that transmuting conflicts with others entails first intellectually assessing a situation and finding the errors in conduct from any of the parties involved including myself? Where I run into problems is when beyond a doubt the other party was behaving wrongly and I try to reject this comprehension and accuse myself of being egotistical when I'm actually being intellectually fair to myself. I then emotionally violate my self with guilt specific to that situation (as opposed to guilt specific to past karma) and lose the emotional energy needed to hold compassion in my thoughts regarding that experience. The egotism lies in my potentially negative emotional response regardless of who's right or wrong and not in my intellectual accuracy, am I right? I understand We should always have love even if we're threatened with murder but that doesn't mean its ok for that person to murder us, right?
7 years ago
·
#8398
Accepted Answer
Comprehension transcends dualism of the mind, "he is right" or "I am right," or "he is wrong" or "I am wrong." We must remember that there is virtue within the villain and vice within the virtuous. Compassion is born from the cognizance of how human beings are drive by unseen forces, a multitude of "I's" that have taken over and abused their intellectual, emotional, and motor-instinctive-sexual centers. "Father forgive them, for they know not what they do."

Study the perfection of patience in The Way of the Bodhisattva by Shantideva, for as this master teaches us, our aggressors are doing us a favor by provoking our defiled emotions to manifest, since through their observation, we in turn learn more about ourselves and work towards the elimination of defects. Thus, our aggressors damn themselves so we can in turn save ourselves. So the truth is, going beyond dualism, we are responsible for bringing others down! This anecdote helps to cut through the dualism of victim vs. victimizer in the mind in order to arrive at comprehension, so we do not act in mistaken ways.

However, if a situation or person is harmful, you do not need to let yourself be abused. Yet in most cases, we tend to feel irritation or frustration when things don't go our way, when the truth is that minor inconveniences help us to discover our outstanding defects.

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

7 years ago
·
#8398
Accepted Answer
Comprehension transcends dualism of the mind, "he is right" or "I am right," or "he is wrong" or "I am wrong." We must remember that there is virtue within the villain and vice within the virtuous. Compassion is born from the cognizance of how human beings are drive by unseen forces, a multitude of "I's" that have taken over and abused their intellectual, emotional, and motor-instinctive-sexual centers. "Father forgive them, for they know not what they do."

Study the perfection of patience in The Way of the Bodhisattva by Shantideva, for as this master teaches us, our aggressors are doing us a favor by provoking our defiled emotions to manifest, since through their observation, we in turn learn more about ourselves and work towards the elimination of defects. Thus, our aggressors damn themselves so we can in turn save ourselves. So the truth is, going beyond dualism, we are responsible for bringing others down! This anecdote helps to cut through the dualism of victim vs. victimizer in the mind in order to arrive at comprehension, so we do not act in mistaken ways.

However, if a situation or person is harmful, you do not need to let yourself be abused. Yet in most cases, we tend to feel irritation or frustration when things don't go our way, when the truth is that minor inconveniences help us to discover our outstanding defects.

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

7 years ago
·
#8533
After 2 weeks of contemplation, I'm beginning to comprehend this. Would You be so kind as to elaborate on "So the truth is, going beyond dualism, we are responsible for bringing others down!" I'm having difficulty understanding this since we may benefit from their choosing to behave a certain way but are we directly causing aka responsible for their behavior? Thank Yo So Much!
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