Sunday, 22 June 2014
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When it comes to the practice of meditation, would the Instructors recommend that the student first concerns himself with developing a stable concentration (as a separate exercise) before engaging with the more analytic stage such as retrospection? Or should the student jump straight into retrospective / analytic meditation under the assumption that concentration will develop alongside this practice?

And when doing an exercise to develop concentration (such as the awareness on the sensation of the breath), should we still be making the effort to remember God in our hearts? Or should we just be trying to focus 100% on the breath?

Thanks very much
8 years ago
·
#6991
Accepted Answer
The Sufis explain this very well.
The key to success in worship lies in meditative reflection (fikrat)…whoever persists in such reflection in the heart will behold the invisible realm in the spirit.

Whoever contemplates God through keeping watch over the thoughts which pass through his heart will be exalted by God in all of his outward deeds.
–Dhū’l-Nūn Miṣrī in ‘Aṭṭār: Tadhkirat, 154-155
Meditative reflection is Serene Reflection mentioned by Samael Aun Weor, otherwise known as Mo Chao. In order to develop serenity, we must learn to concentrate. Therefore, build yourself up through concentration practices, mantra, prayer, etc., so as to assist with reflection (imagination) in retrospective meditation without forgetting what your doing or being cloudy in the mind.

Serenity is developed, meditative reflection (fikrat) (or serene mind and imagination) is cultivated through the remembrance of the Being, whether we are performing mantras, breathing exercises, pranayama, sexual alchemy, etc. Focus on God within, who is also within your breath!.
[Al-Jurayri] said that whoever does not establish awe of duty (through respecting the practices of this tradition and being consistent with one's practices) and vigilance in his relationship to God will not arrive at disclosure of the unseen or contemplation (mushahadah, to bear witness) of the divine. —Al-Qushayri, Al-Risalah

For thirty years I sought God. But when I looked carefully I found that in reality God was the seeker and I the sought. -Bayazid al-Bastami

8 years ago
·
#7083
Thank you Almustafa! This covers a lot of ground and is deep and rich :)

Thank you
8 years ago
·
#6991
Accepted Answer
The Sufis explain this very well.
The key to success in worship lies in meditative reflection (fikrat)…whoever persists in such reflection in the heart will behold the invisible realm in the spirit.

Whoever contemplates God through keeping watch over the thoughts which pass through his heart will be exalted by God in all of his outward deeds.
–Dhū’l-Nūn Miṣrī in ‘Aṭṭār: Tadhkirat, 154-155
Meditative reflection is Serene Reflection mentioned by Samael Aun Weor, otherwise known as Mo Chao. In order to develop serenity, we must learn to concentrate. Therefore, build yourself up through concentration practices, mantra, prayer, etc., so as to assist with reflection (imagination) in retrospective meditation without forgetting what your doing or being cloudy in the mind.

Serenity is developed, meditative reflection (fikrat) (or serene mind and imagination) is cultivated through the remembrance of the Being, whether we are performing mantras, breathing exercises, pranayama, sexual alchemy, etc. Focus on God within, who is also within your breath!.
[Al-Jurayri] said that whoever does not establish awe of duty (through respecting the practices of this tradition and being consistent with one's practices) and vigilance in his relationship to God will not arrive at disclosure of the unseen or contemplation (mushahadah, to bear witness) of the divine. —Al-Qushayri, Al-Risalah

For thirty years I sought God. But when I looked carefully I found that in reality God was the seeker and I the sought. -Bayazid al-Bastami

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