Monday, 05 May 2014
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What is the instincual brain and what does it do? What are our instincts?

What is the motor brain and what does it do?

When I see my defects come out and during work in retrospection I feel that I don't know what intellectual animal instincts are and what the motor brain does.

Motor Brain: Is how I move sometimes a defect? Autonomic biological functions? What is the motor brain and what does it do and how does it (ego) trap the essence in the motor brain(what does the ego do with instinct/motor brains?)? Is this related to laziness and illnesses? Wasting energy like in too much athleticism?(for example)
8 years ago
·
#6583
Accepted Answer
The Motor-Instinctive-Sexual Brain processes our physiological and psychological energies related to movement, instinct, and sexuality. Instinct is our animal inheritance from the lower kingdoms of evolution, such as the subconscious tendency towards procreation, survival, and reaction towards pain and pleasure.

When we place our hand on the stove and get burned, we immediately remove our hand from the metal and later our mind reacts with our emotional center, "Ouch! That was hot!" However, your instinctual center, processing the pain at a greater speed, impelled you to remove yourself from danger and the source of pain before you even could think about it. This shows that the instinctual center processes at a faster speed than thought, and almost on par with emotional states.

The instinctual center is typically abused by boxers. They have to react to punches and blows from their opponents; they instinctually react through movement, the motor brain, along with the compulsion to avoid pain and to inflict pain. This is an animal trait that has become strengthened through our modern behavior.

Movement, therefore, is our capacity to control our body. It does not require thought. Dancers, who try to learn new steps, use their head first and obviously meander, clumsily knocking into their partner's feet. This is due to the fact that the motor center is faster than the intellect, and to try to rationalize movement is to only slow oneself down. Therefore, in order to learn how to move the body, one must learn not to think!

Our movements and tendencies towards certain movements relate to egos and our personality, habits that have crystallized within this particular life. The way we move, talk, speak, act, dance, and move, relate to our personality, but also our ego manifesting itself through our three brains and feeding off of movement, such as feeling lust or pride by the way one dances (just watch Dance with the Stars). Our egos have certain ways of feeding themselves by the way we move our bodies, walk down the street, talk with the opposite sex or with friends, etc. These types of characteristics in how we move relate to our motor center, but also the other centers, because we feel a certain way and might harbor certain thoughts in relation to our sense of identity.

Laziness relates to all three brains, but when we do not feel like movement, we can say this also relates to an ego manifesting with predominance in the motor center. Physical illnesses can result from the abuse of the motor brain, such as paraplegia, paralysis, nerve damage, which is something many boxers, fighters, and football players often encounter.

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

8 years ago
·
#6583
Accepted Answer
The Motor-Instinctive-Sexual Brain processes our physiological and psychological energies related to movement, instinct, and sexuality. Instinct is our animal inheritance from the lower kingdoms of evolution, such as the subconscious tendency towards procreation, survival, and reaction towards pain and pleasure.

When we place our hand on the stove and get burned, we immediately remove our hand from the metal and later our mind reacts with our emotional center, "Ouch! That was hot!" However, your instinctual center, processing the pain at a greater speed, impelled you to remove yourself from danger and the source of pain before you even could think about it. This shows that the instinctual center processes at a faster speed than thought, and almost on par with emotional states.

The instinctual center is typically abused by boxers. They have to react to punches and blows from their opponents; they instinctually react through movement, the motor brain, along with the compulsion to avoid pain and to inflict pain. This is an animal trait that has become strengthened through our modern behavior.

Movement, therefore, is our capacity to control our body. It does not require thought. Dancers, who try to learn new steps, use their head first and obviously meander, clumsily knocking into their partner's feet. This is due to the fact that the motor center is faster than the intellect, and to try to rationalize movement is to only slow oneself down. Therefore, in order to learn how to move the body, one must learn not to think!

Our movements and tendencies towards certain movements relate to egos and our personality, habits that have crystallized within this particular life. The way we move, talk, speak, act, dance, and move, relate to our personality, but also our ego manifesting itself through our three brains and feeding off of movement, such as feeling lust or pride by the way one dances (just watch Dance with the Stars). Our egos have certain ways of feeding themselves by the way we move our bodies, walk down the street, talk with the opposite sex or with friends, etc. These types of characteristics in how we move relate to our motor center, but also the other centers, because we feel a certain way and might harbor certain thoughts in relation to our sense of identity.

Laziness relates to all three brains, but when we do not feel like movement, we can say this also relates to an ego manifesting with predominance in the motor center. Physical illnesses can result from the abuse of the motor brain, such as paraplegia, paralysis, nerve damage, which is something many boxers, fighters, and football players often encounter.

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

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