Sunday, 03 February 2013
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I am seeking insight from an instructor regarding this, because it is a delicate subject.

In the gnosis movement, we are encourage to teach, help, and encourage others on the path, in any way we can. A side effect of this work for humanity, is this delicate dilemma..

When someone has that deep spiritual yearning towards the teachings, but has not yet been introduced, they can find themselves magnetically attracted to those whom are studying the teachings.

Then the person, can confuse their spiritual yearning, as a loving attraction for the person whom is trying to point them in the direction of the teachings. They can easily be lead astray, and confuse their own seeking, as an emotional attachment or the hollywood depicted "love", towards that "white knight" that comes to save them.

I know of people whom in such a position would attempt to "convert" the individual into the movement, with the intend of finding making them their spouse, trying to remedy their loneliness, i'm sure this is common. But Samael states we must not be attached to the results of our sacrifice to others.

This is an issue which has arisen a few times to me, and my approach has always been the same, but I am starting to have doubts..

How can one approach this? Knowing that, the individual is in a state where, we could easily and accidentally destroy their progress, by bluntly asserting that we are not interested in them in that type of way, and that we are only trying to act as a signpost, for the wayfarer, on their journey towards the great mountain.
9 years ago
·
#3063
Accepted Answer
An instructor can only do so much. People are free to follow or to reject the instructions of the Christ. This is free will. You have to be honest with yourself and your students above all things, even if it may offend or bring them pain. As Shakespeare once wrote:

Polonius:
This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
-Hamlet, Act 1, scene 2, 78-80

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

9 years ago
·
#3063
Accepted Answer
An instructor can only do so much. People are free to follow or to reject the instructions of the Christ. This is free will. You have to be honest with yourself and your students above all things, even if it may offend or bring them pain. As Shakespeare once wrote:

Polonius:
This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
-Hamlet, Act 1, scene 2, 78-80

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

9 years ago
·
#4037
A very inspirational quote, and message, thank you for your input.
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