Tuesday, 29 March 2022
  7 Replies
  290 Visits
I was wondering if anyone knows if there's a quick way to recover from sleep deprivation. I was also wondering if meditation can be used as a substitute for sleep. Sometimes I find that trying to meditate just prevents me from going to sleep, but maybe I'm using too much effort.

And also, can just lying in bed create the necessary rest that I need? Do I really need to enter the dream state (and therefore lose consciousness) to recover from sleep deprivation?

I also find that I breath really fast during the day, especially when I get sleepy. My fast breathing creates a sense of anxiety in me. Is there any value in slowing down the speed of one's breath. For me, it's really hard to maintain this because once I consciously slow down my breath (by doing deep breathing exercises), it just returns to its fast rhythm after I stop doing the breathing exercises. Could this be counter productive, and possibly a form of suppression? Is it possible to permanently slow my breathing if I consciously slow it down with ongoing vigilance, even during sleep? Or is it better to just let it slow down on its own by just letting the mind relax?
3 weeks ago
·
#27344
Accepted Answer
If you are looking to improve your sleep, we recommend consulting a sleep doctor.

Experienced meditators combine meditation with sleep, thereby awakening consciousness in the higher worlds.

Proper meditation must be combined with drowsiness.

Breathing improves the more we relax our mental, emotional, and psychological states. Also, moderate exercise helps to regulate breathing as well.

Suppression occurs when we exert too much force. Real willpower over our behaviors comes about through familiarization, equanimity, and relaxation.

For thirty years I sought God. But when I looked carefully I found that in reality God was the seeker and I the sought. -Bayazid al-Bastami

3 weeks ago
·
#27344
Accepted Answer
If you are looking to improve your sleep, we recommend consulting a sleep doctor.

Experienced meditators combine meditation with sleep, thereby awakening consciousness in the higher worlds.

Proper meditation must be combined with drowsiness.

Breathing improves the more we relax our mental, emotional, and psychological states. Also, moderate exercise helps to regulate breathing as well.

Suppression occurs when we exert too much force. Real willpower over our behaviors comes about through familiarization, equanimity, and relaxation.

For thirty years I sought God. But when I looked carefully I found that in reality God was the seeker and I the sought. -Bayazid al-Bastami

3 weeks ago
·
#27374
Experienced meditators combine meditation with sleep, thereby awakening consciousness in the higher worlds.

Proper meditation must be combined with drowsiness.



My preferred method of meditating is to just let everything be as it is. Is there any specific instruction for the type of meditation that you are talking about?

Sometimes I meditate on equanimity. But I stopped doing that since I realized that equanimity is just a natural byproduct of allowing everything to be as it is.

Isn't it true that meditation just starts to happen on its own when we allow everything to be as it is? And when I say "allow everything to be as it is" I'm not talking about indulging my destructive fantasies, I'm just talking about letting things come and go, without clinging. Can't this approach to meditation also awaken consciousness?
3 weeks ago
·
#27377
The form of meditation you’re referencing is beneficial and can awaken consciousness. It is a non-exclusive or Zen form of meditation.

This can be more difficult than exclusive forms of meditation, whereby you concentrate upon one object at the exclusion of everything else. However, the end result is illumination.

These two courses explain both methods well:

For thirty years I sought God. But when I looked carefully I found that in reality God was the seeker and I the sought. -Bayazid al-Bastami

3 weeks ago
·
#27380
This can be more difficult than exclusive forms of meditation, whereby you concentrate upon one object at the exclusion of everything else. However, the end result is illumination.


Why do you say that the non-exclusive or Zen form of meditation is more difficult? Isn't it easier since you don't have to focus on anything and you can just let your mind wander.

And are you implying that even during the Zen meditation you have to retain a sense of equanimity? Equanimity with whatever arises in the mind? I haven't really been doing that, and maybe I should...
2 weeks ago
·
#27392
Non-exclusive meditation is not mental wandering. Study the two courses we provided for clarity.

Yes, Zen meditation requires equanimity. Study the following course for a better understanding of how to master it:

For thirty years I sought God. But when I looked carefully I found that in reality God was the seeker and I the sought. -Bayazid al-Bastami

2 weeks ago
·
#27396
Thanks, Almustafa.
Almustafa selected the reply #27344 as the answer for this post — 2 weeks ago
2 weeks ago
·
#27415
I came to the conclusion that it's not necessary to manufacture a state of equanimity since equanimity is already the nature of the mind. Trying to concentrate or focus on equanimity is counterproductive, leads to suppression, and just creates another delusion. The thoughts that arise within the field of consciousness arise from consciousness itself and are therefore not separate from consciousness. It is a function of consciousness to give rise to ideas. If you focus on the equanimous aspect of consciousness at the exclusion of the turbulence of the contents of consciousness you would only be making equanimity into another a delusion. You aren't really meditating until you get rid of all "pairs of opposites" of all conceptions of goodness and badness, of all discriminative thinking. Our nature is intrinsically equanimous, and to the extent that we give up discriminative thinking, there will remain nothing but equanimity. The same applies to purity. Our nature is intrinsically pure, and to the extent that we give up discriminative thinking, there will remain nothing but purity.

It's okay to let the mind wander, provided that we restrain ourselves from acting upon it. We can restrain ourselves by setting aside formal periods of meditation. But ultimately, we have to give up our own personal will in our daily lives.
  • Page :
  • 1
There are no replies made for this post yet.

Testimonials

  • I am so very grateful for you all and what you have done in my life to help me realize myself and what path it’s actually wise to tread and stay on. Thank you I honestly cannot thank you enough.

    S.C.
  • I cannot thank you enough for all that you are doing and providing to spread the opportunity of true Gnosis. I have greatly benefited from the information on the website...

    B.D.
  • Your lectures, books, practices, etc. have radically changed my life in a profound manner. Especially putting into daily practice the teachings from the lectures... Your efforts making the lectures and everyone involved who makes it possible are a true blessing to humanity and beyond.

    AMST
  • These books have helped me changed my whole reality,..... Tragic and beautiful that pendulum we swing,...

    F.L.
  • Your books, lectures and courses have made the last years of my life complete. When that final hour comes, I know I will land in the right place.

    T.M.
  • What you guys are doing is really wonderful. You have helped me understand in my spiritual practice. I am truly grateful that your works is changing lives. When the student is really ready, the teacher has finally arrive to guide. 

    R.