Wednesday, 26 February 2020
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Hello Instructors,

In The Great Rebellion Samael Aun Weor states that the Path of the Razor’s Edge is beyond good and evil. What does this mean?

To become a Super Human Being, a Superman, is not easy. There is no doubt that the road which leads to the Superman is beyond good and evil. A thing is good when it suits us and bad when it does not. Within the rhythms of poetry, crime is also concealed. There is much virtue in the villain and much evil in the virtuous. The road which leads to the Superman is the path of the razor’s edge. This path is filled with perils from both within and without. Evil is dangerous and good is also dangerous. The frightening path is beyond good and evil; it is terribly cruel


I've been trying to understand these statements for quite some time.

Firstly, it seems to me that Samael Aun Weor is of course not rejecting ethics – since we know that ethics is the heart and soul of the path. When Samael Aun Weor states that we must go beyond good and evil, is he perhaps speaking about the good and evil of morality? Since morality is not the equivalent of ethics. Morality is based upon tradition, custom, habit. Whilst genuine ethics is scientific and is based upon the law of karma. For instance, there are many actions which our current society deems morally permissible (such as fornication) which are in fact harmful from an ethical-scientific point of view – from the standpoint of the law of karma.

Another interesting point is that we have many egos which have the desire to perform good and positive actions and have the desire to be "good" or the desire to be seen as good – which are related to the Pharisees which Jesus speaks of in the Gospels. However, such egoic "good" impulses are still unconscious – there is no consciousness or awareness in them. They can even harm others. For instance, deep down, they could be based on pride, or fear. Is this perhaps the “good” which Samael Aun Weor states we have to go beyond?

It is also possible to harm others with our good qualities if they are used unwisely. For instance, let us say in our job we have to support and deal with individuals who can sometimes display challenging and difficult behaviour. We may have a certain quantity of the virtue of patience. But that patience – if used unwisely – could actually produce a deterioration of the situation. For example, a situation involving challenging behaviour may warrant the firm setting of a boundary (though done without anger), rather than simply patience on its own. If one was to approach such a situation only with patience, then the situation may get out of hand, may deteriorate – which would create harm not only for oneself but also the person you are supporting. So it strikes me that we have to be conscious of the use of our good qualities. As Samael Aun Weor states, “Evil is dangerous and good is also dangerous”.

In Introduction of Naked Awareness, Padmasambhava teaches that our true and deepest nature abides in an unconstructed and unconditioned manner, beyond conditioning, beyond the push and pull of duality – which is similar to the teaching of the Tao in the Tao Che Ching. The consciousness is in itself serenity, peace, compassion. But could it be that the egoic drives of “good” and “evil” both take us away from the unconditioned and unconstructed pure nature of the consciousness? Could it be that we not only have to fight against the harmful and bad impulses which arise from the ego, but also against the unconscious “good” impulses which arise from the ego?

Thank you
2 years ago
·
#21259
Accepted Answer
Good and evil are relative. What is good for the black magician is negative for the pratyeka buddhas (saints).

What is good for the saints is negative for the demons.

Bodhisattvas learn to go beyond appearances, what people consider good or evil.

They are incredible rebels who act upon their deepest intuitions, which are free of attachments.

Divinity is terribly divine, beyond morality, concepts, institutions, and beliefs, whether saintly or demonic.

People believe in God, but do not wish to accept that Christ is revolutionary and teaches us to eliminate all fear and attachments, a terrifying concept for both saints and demons.

The best way to comprehend the path beyond good and evil is to study yourself and to invoke Christ within the internal planes.
2 years ago
·
#21259
Accepted Answer
Good and evil are relative. What is good for the black magician is negative for the pratyeka buddhas (saints).

What is good for the saints is negative for the demons.

Bodhisattvas learn to go beyond appearances, what people consider good or evil.

They are incredible rebels who act upon their deepest intuitions, which are free of attachments.

Divinity is terribly divine, beyond morality, concepts, institutions, and beliefs, whether saintly or demonic.

People believe in God, but do not wish to accept that Christ is revolutionary and teaches us to eliminate all fear and attachments, a terrifying concept for both saints and demons.

The best way to comprehend the path beyond good and evil is to study yourself and to invoke Christ within the internal planes.
2 years ago
·
#21429
Thank you Almustafa :)
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