Tuesday, 21 February 2017
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I've been having trouble understanding the multiple meaning of the letter aleph. from the alphabet of kabbalah course it goes on to explain the word aleph in relation to speech and among other things. my understanding so far of the meaning(keep in mind i'm extremely new to Hebrew) is that א represents both the physical air and the abstract "air" that encompasses thoughts, emotion, and anything creative that enter into our being. which is then organized and then expressed through the word or speech using the physical air. so in essence א means the infinite possibility of abstract expression, which is represented by wind or air and is not physical in that since; but is expressed physically with actual air or with the breath. the reason this is possible is because of the 3 primary forces kether, chokmah, and binah which א represents based on the construction of the letter being made up of three iods. i haven't delved into the meanings of kether, chokmah, and binah yet so i'm not entirely sure what that has to do with aleph.
So correct me if i'm wrong, aleph א represents how god or the consciousness creates through the word using the physical air and the abstract air that is the first emanation of creation. This doesn't only apply to the word but applies to anything creative, because the whole of a human physically is an aleph with the 2 arms being the iods and the head down to the feet is the vav. Though the word is more potent in this case. am i in the ball park?

Additional questions
Which should a student study first, the tree of life and it's sephiroth, or the Hebrew alphabet?
it seems the letters of the Hebrew alphabet have more to do with the tree than the other way around. i see that the tree of life and the hebrew letters are intertwined which makes it difficult to understand concepts if one doesn't have a solid foundation in either teachings.
5 years ago
·
#13660
Accepted Answer
The Hebrew letters are symbols, and like any symbol they reveal meaning in context. Think of it this way: what does the number one mean? What does the number one relate to? If you consider this, there is no "easy" answer, since you have a lifetime of using the number one symbolically and contextually. The Hebrew letters are the same: with use, you will start to understand them in the same way you use the letters of English or numbers. They are "simple" and sophisticated at the same time.

Regarding the collection of your questions, we can answer in the same way: how did you learn English or learn to use numbers? Slowly, gradually, but mostly by using it daily. So in the same way, be patient and work with the letters at the same time as the Tree of Life. As you see, they are interdependent. They need to be studied together.

Let me also say that you will not finish. Even after years of studying them, we still regularly discover new aspects and new meanings, and so continually feel like ignorant beginners! :D

A great place to center yourself in these studies is this book:

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." - Samael Aun Weor

5 years ago
·
#13660
Accepted Answer
The Hebrew letters are symbols, and like any symbol they reveal meaning in context. Think of it this way: what does the number one mean? What does the number one relate to? If you consider this, there is no "easy" answer, since you have a lifetime of using the number one symbolically and contextually. The Hebrew letters are the same: with use, you will start to understand them in the same way you use the letters of English or numbers. They are "simple" and sophisticated at the same time.

Regarding the collection of your questions, we can answer in the same way: how did you learn English or learn to use numbers? Slowly, gradually, but mostly by using it daily. So in the same way, be patient and work with the letters at the same time as the Tree of Life. As you see, they are interdependent. They need to be studied together.

Let me also say that you will not finish. Even after years of studying them, we still regularly discover new aspects and new meanings, and so continually feel like ignorant beginners! :D

A great place to center yourself in these studies is this book:

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." - Samael Aun Weor

5 years ago
·
#13673
Well... That's discouraging. Ill give it a shot though. Thanks for your time.
5 years ago
·
#13675
Learning a language takes patience and study. Hebrew is obviously a language, but Kabbalah is a far deeper and more profound language...

But do not be discouraged: like any language, once you start understanding what is being said, it is a wonderful experience.

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." - Samael Aun Weor

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