Friday, 15 April 2016
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How far do we push our meditation? I have resolved to reclaim dominion of my mind and i am becoming more aware of how distracted I actually am. It almost feels like I am going a bit mad and my mind is becoming worse but I know its because I can more clearly see the state that my mind is in.

So when we are training our concentration and we feel the urge to get up and do something else or carry on with the business of the day what is a good gauge as to how far to push it? let me clarify: Lets say for 30 min concentration is fairly easy. My attention wavers from the breath a little but I am able to bring it back quickly and am aware that I have lost attention. But after a certain time this becomes more difficult. Time is passing and my mind begins to feel the urges to begin the activities of the day.. “we need to work on our business, we need to make that phone call, etc..”

I know this is a question that does not really have an exact answer but when is is appropriate to stop fighting against these urges and end the practice? When we are spending more time being distracted than focusing? I have come to realize that in order to get stronger I must always push the boundaries of what I am capable of. So lets say for 30 min concentration is easy, but then it becomes more difficult, so after that I should exert the will power to regain control a little longer and increase my capabilities. Similar to the gym. If you stay lifting the same weight you wont get any stronger and grow and if you stop an exercise before you are pushing the muscle to its limits it wont grow as well. You guys also say that meditation should require no exertion but maybe thats after you have built the muscle up. Am I correct in this understanding?

Much Thanks
6 years ago
·
#11638
Accepted Answer
Use your intuition. You need to gauge from your experience what is practical, to be firm in a discipline without become so rigid that the discipline snaps, leaving you burned out and abandoning the practice altogether.

I recommend in the beginning to practice numerous, but short meditation sessions, so as to gradually build stamina and endurance. You will naturally gravitate towards the practice as you progressively see and feel the benefits in your own heart, perception and experience.

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

6 years ago
·
#11638
Accepted Answer
Use your intuition. You need to gauge from your experience what is practical, to be firm in a discipline without become so rigid that the discipline snaps, leaving you burned out and abandoning the practice altogether.

I recommend in the beginning to practice numerous, but short meditation sessions, so as to gradually build stamina and endurance. You will naturally gravitate towards the practice as you progressively see and feel the benefits in your own heart, perception and experience.

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

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