Thursday, 17 March 2016
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If one is seriously ill, should they continue to transmute, vocalize mantras, and perform rituals when they are able? Or does this use of energy make it more difficult for the body to heal?
6 years ago
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#11396
Accepted Answer
You question reminds me of the following Story of the Master Meng Shan:
Meng Shan was triumphantly advancing in his studies, nonetheless, in life not everything comes up roses, there are also thorns. So, in the month of July, during the fifth year of Chindin (1264), he unfortunately got dysentery in Chunking, a province of Szechuan.

With death on his lips, he decided to make his will and to dispose of his terrene goods. When this was done, he slowly rose to a sitting position, burned incense, and sat in an elevated place. There, in silence, he prayed to the three Blessed Ones and to the Holy Gods by repenting all the evil deeds he had committed in his life.

However, since he considered the end of his existence definite, he asked the ineffable ones to hear his last petition: “By means of the power of Prajna and a controlled mental state, I want to reincarnate myself in a favorable place, where I can become a monk (swami) at an early age. If perchance I recuperate myself from this illness, I will renounce the world, take the vows, and try to carry the light to other young Buddhists.”

After pronouncing these vows, he submerged himself into a profound Meditation while mentally chanting the mantra Wu. The sickness was tormenting him, his intestines were frighteningly torturing him, but he resolved not to pay attention to them. -Samael Aun Weor, The Magic of the Runes

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

6 years ago
·
#11396
Accepted Answer
You question reminds me of the following Story of the Master Meng Shan:
Meng Shan was triumphantly advancing in his studies, nonetheless, in life not everything comes up roses, there are also thorns. So, in the month of July, during the fifth year of Chindin (1264), he unfortunately got dysentery in Chunking, a province of Szechuan.

With death on his lips, he decided to make his will and to dispose of his terrene goods. When this was done, he slowly rose to a sitting position, burned incense, and sat in an elevated place. There, in silence, he prayed to the three Blessed Ones and to the Holy Gods by repenting all the evil deeds he had committed in his life.

However, since he considered the end of his existence definite, he asked the ineffable ones to hear his last petition: “By means of the power of Prajna and a controlled mental state, I want to reincarnate myself in a favorable place, where I can become a monk (swami) at an early age. If perchance I recuperate myself from this illness, I will renounce the world, take the vows, and try to carry the light to other young Buddhists.”

After pronouncing these vows, he submerged himself into a profound Meditation while mentally chanting the mantra Wu. The sickness was tormenting him, his intestines were frighteningly torturing him, but he resolved not to pay attention to them. -Samael Aun Weor, The Magic of the Runes

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

6 years ago
·
#11429
Thank you, Benedictus. There is a lot I can meditate on in that story!
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