Saturday, 23 August 2014
  1 Replies
  1.2K Visits
I am not sure what my attitude towards sin should be. When witnessing terrible things that are sin such as fornication, lewdness, or abortion for example, what should be my attitude towards such things? Naturaly i feel thoughts of cotempt and rejection, but i am also aware that i should not judge lest i be judged. its confusing. When witnessing such things i know i should become aware of what flaw i have within that seeing these things make me aware of, like maybe pride or anger. from there i should take the steps to eliminate those egos. That being said.... what should my attitude be towards sin? I wish to reject sin in all its forms and turn away from it, i wish to delight in virtue. Is it wrong to hate sin? hate is anger, and anger is wrong. how do i reject crimes without being judgmental? he who is without sin cast the first stone, true. But you have to kill cancer before it spreads, this is also true. In nations with shariah law where adulterers are killed, people tend to commit adultery much much less, even if the thoughts are in their mind, it is not acted upon. This is good. None the less he that looks at a woman to lust after her has commited adultery in his heart already, so he without sin cast the first stone. I hope you can clear up my confusion. Its good to have laws that create the conditions nessesary for cultivating virtue. But that requires judgement of others. please clarify.
7 years ago
·
#7531
Accepted Answer
One must not justify desires.

One must also not repress and condemn one's defects with the mind.

The mind only knows how to label things. It cannot understand itself.

We must learn to see our mind for what it is, without going to either extreme. This is comprehension.

Comprehension, we can say, is the divine aspect of Geburah, which is Divine Judgment. This is not egotistical judgment, the mind seeing the mind and protesting, "What a wicked person I am!"

The consciousness, Geburah, is the true judge of all things. But this is not accomplished through repression or justification. It is the conscious discrimination of seeing things as they are.

Study these books!

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

7 years ago
·
#7531
Accepted Answer
One must not justify desires.

One must also not repress and condemn one's defects with the mind.

The mind only knows how to label things. It cannot understand itself.

We must learn to see our mind for what it is, without going to either extreme. This is comprehension.

Comprehension, we can say, is the divine aspect of Geburah, which is Divine Judgment. This is not egotistical judgment, the mind seeing the mind and protesting, "What a wicked person I am!"

The consciousness, Geburah, is the true judge of all things. But this is not accomplished through repression or justification. It is the conscious discrimination of seeing things as they are.

Study these books!

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

There are no replies made for this post yet.