Thursday, 15 May 2014
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Greetings!

It's been a long time since I wanted to ask about it.
It seems strange that Gnosis refers to wisdom of all ancient cultures, but russian culture is totally absent, it doesn't even exist on the map of 7 sub races of Aryan race.
While implications of russian language are absolutely marvellous. Just a few:

jnana - knowledge - знание (spelled "znanie")
consciousness - сознание - literally "with knowledge"
comprehension - познание
X P standing for Christ - ХРИСТОС - spelled "HRISTOS", H like in rune Hagal
Temple - ХРАМ - spelled "HRAM"
РАДОСТЬ - joy - literally "enough of RA"
РАДУГА literally "RA BOW" - RAINBOW (bow = дуга, RA IN BOW)
culture - КУЛЬТУРА - literally CULT of RA

And the last special one, there's famous saying "выйти сухим из воды" which means "to get out dry out of the water" ;)
(well, they say it when somebody got out of some big trouble, but the original meaning seems obvious)

In general it is very close to the runic language where letters are images, and when combining, the new images arise, and each word is like a multidimensional image...

However, unfortunately, unlike hebrew, there are no original spiritual texts in russian whatsoever (all burned or hidden from the public), so the only way is to dig into language itself, and old proverbs, tales, etc...

Moreover, the language itself is very distorted, it seems like our culture was eradicated from Earth many times, but still not completely dead...

Thank you for your attention if you're still reading ;), and would be enormously grateful, if you could give me some insight on the topic...
8 years ago
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#6678
Accepted Answer
The Gnostic tradition has been present in all of the great cultures of humanity, including the Russian. No one is forgotten by God.

The lack of resources related to that culture on this site is just a reflection of the idiosyncrasies of our instructors. We look inwards when determining what to share outwardly, and many of us have affinities with particular cultures or spiritual traditions that manifest in the types of teachings we offer.

What is important is not the cultural mantle the teachings wear, but rather the root knowledge, the Gnosis, that is at the center of them all. We hope that by offering the teaching from many different perspectives, students will be able to see through the veils of culture and belief, and arrive at a genuine understanding of what Gnosis is really about.
8 years ago
·
#6678
Accepted Answer
The Gnostic tradition has been present in all of the great cultures of humanity, including the Russian. No one is forgotten by God.

The lack of resources related to that culture on this site is just a reflection of the idiosyncrasies of our instructors. We look inwards when determining what to share outwardly, and many of us have affinities with particular cultures or spiritual traditions that manifest in the types of teachings we offer.

What is important is not the cultural mantle the teachings wear, but rather the root knowledge, the Gnosis, that is at the center of them all. We hope that by offering the teaching from many different perspectives, students will be able to see through the veils of culture and belief, and arrive at a genuine understanding of what Gnosis is really about.
8 years ago
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#6683
Thank you very much for your reply, Nicodemus. In fact, it happens exactly as you say: using your instructions and having all these different perspectives, it becomes possible to see through the veil of own culture (which is in fact very fruitful, because when you see it in your own language, the reaction of consciousness is very strong)...
8 years ago
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#6685
I particularly enjoy the writings of Fyodor Dostoevsky, who was an esoteric novelist. His books contain tremendous insight into the spiritual path. For example, in Crime and Punishment, Raskolnikov, an impoverished student bursting with philosophical ambitions, decides to test his humanity by committing the murder of an old, degenerate pawnbroker. He decides that this person is worthless to society, whose absence will not be grieved, and he resolves himself to murder this person so as to prove his doctrine of moral superiority, reminiscent of Nietzsche's teaching of the Ubermensch or Superman.

He commits the murder, and then grapples with something completely unexpected: his own conscience. The rest of the novel explains his turmoil for having committed the deed, since the name Raskolnikov comes from the Russian raskolnik, meaning "schismatic" and raskol, which means "schism," or "split." This is because Raskolnikov is a Hasnamussen with the ego very alive. His ego drives him to murder and to justify his sin, but his inner divinity compels him to reconciliation through the help of the repented prostitute Sonya, his own Mary Magdalene.

The Idiot, composed after Crime and Punishment, also teaches us profound principles. Prince Lev Nikolayevich Myshkin returns from his stay in a sanitarium in Switzerland for his epilepsy and idiocy, in order to be among his Russian people. His virtues and innocent demeanor wins over those with whom he meets; however, his lack of knowledge of 19th century high Russian society and intrigue drives him towards catastrophe, whereby he becomes the friend of the dark Rogozhin, the latter who is fascinated with the tumultuous and fallen woman Anastassya Filippovna Barashkov.

Prince Myshkin becomes involved in countless intrigues and the dark circle of humanity due to his naivety and inexperience with society. Samael Aun Weor warned that being and knowledge must be completely balanced, for too much knowledge creates intellectual confusion, whereas too much being without knowledge can create cases as serious as a stupid saint. Myshkin is precisely the stupid saint, the "positively beautiful man" or archetype of the Russian Christ who, without knowing how to relate to people and how to defend himself from manipulative intent, ends up in destruction.

Myshkin is also another fallen Bodhisattva, a Hasnamuss with a double center of gravity, since Lev in Russian signifies "lion" and mysh "mouse." His Being is a lion of Judah with tremendous virtues, but the human soul, the mouse, is too meek with false Christian piety and does not know diplomacy. He is the fool of Arcanum 21, who does not know how to help others without compromising himself!

He is caught between two women, Anastassya Filippovna Barashkov, the fallen woman, and the good and chaste Aglaya Ivanovna. Anastasis in Greek reminds us of the resurrection of the lamb (Russian Barashkov). However this is the delusion surrounding this destroyed woman, who is the lower animal soul, Nephesh, that promises resurrection but only provides pain and oblivion. Aglaya represents Neshamah, the spiritual soul, since AGLA is the Hebrew Attar Gibur Leolam Adonai, signifying, "You are almighty forever, O Lord." Ivavovna has the vowels, sequentially, "IAO," pointing towards Jehovah.

This is Arcanum Six, Indecision, the conflict between the virgin and the whore. I will not tell you what happens, but it is a powerful teaching!

I have not read the later masterpieces by Dostoevsky, including Demons, The Adolescent and Brothers Karamazov, but when I do, we can talk about it!

Joyful in hope, suffering in tribulation, be thou constant in thy prayer.

Benedictis, qui venit in nomine Domini. Osanna in excelsis.

"Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest!"

8 years ago
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#6699
Benedictus, thank you very much for the insight! I knew that Dostoyevsky was a great writer, and I was going to read his books, but I didn't have a clue that they had such deep esoteric meaning. So now I'm very intrigued, and I am going to read them sooner than later.
By the way, about the Demons: there is something very interesting about the name of this novel. When I met the doctrine of many "I's", I thought that we should have some particular word for that in our language. We have something very similar called "бесы", and it's exactly original name of Demons (we have word demon too, but here is another word "бес" which doesn't seem to have an equivalent in english). So, perhaps, the correct translation would be I's ;)
Well, I haven't read it myself, so it might get clearer after I read it. It would be very interesting to know what you think about it when you will read it too.

I also read Demon (here it's the real demon) by Mikhail Lermontov, a very short poem which tells a story of a demon, fallen Cherubim. It describes his feelings in an incredibly realistic manner. It shows him completely dissatisfied by his own doings. He then sees a very beautiful women on the face of the earth, and the light of hope for salvation and new life appears inside of him. However, he ends up being consumed by lust and anger, and is getting nowhere...
There are also great illustrations by Russian painter Vrubel:
http://vrubel-lermontov.ru/i/illustration/demon_flight.jpg
http://vrubel-lermontov.ru/i/illustration/angel_demon.jpg

Well, I am tremendously grateful for the reply, and will be very glad to talk about the writings later on! :)
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