Tuesday, 01 February 2022
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Instructors,

I am trying to reconcile the following from Gen 6 with other stricture that indicates the world as we know it will end:

"and the LORD said in his heart, I will not again curse the ground any more for man’s sake; for the imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done."

I would appreciate any insight into this.

Thank you,

Jon
7 months ago
·
#26986
Accepted Answer
The verse you cited (Genesis 8:21) is from the story of Noah and the Ark. To understand this story, you need to view it as a symbolic representation of elements of the Path, not a story about a man in a boat with animals. Otherwise, you will encounter many apparent contradictions (not just the one you cited).

We have two lectures on this site, called "The Ark of Noah" that elaborates the symbolism of this story. I have linked them below, and suggest you study them if you want to learn more.

Now, with respect to the specific verse that you cited, it occurs after Noah has disembarked from the Ark and sacrificed the animals (i.e., he had already built the solar bodies and was in the process of eliminating his animal ego).

That is the context for that verse. So when the Lord says, "I will not again curse the ground," the "ground" is not the physical earth, but rather refers to Noah specifically (or better said, any initiate who performs the work of Noah).

Now let us see what the Zohar has to say about this verse:

Said Rabbi Hezekiah: "It is written, 'And the Lord said in his heart, I will not again curse the ground any more for man's sake' (Gen. VIII. 21). What do these words mean?"

Said Rabbi Jose: "I have heard Rabbi Simeon say, 'When fire from heaven is intense and comes into contact with matter, it produces a thick smoke that is exceedingly harmful to the world; and the more its heat falls on mankind the more injurious it is to them, on account of the smoke sent forth by which they are suffocated and destroyed. But, when it is moderate and not in excess, it is no longer a destructive agent.' The meaning of the words to asiph (will not again) is, 'I will not augment the heat that I send unto the world below and which on coming into contact with the matter of the earth gives rise to smoke that is deleterious and destructive to life.'"


The fire from heaven is the force of Binah, the Holy Spirit, or the Divine Mother. That force has two polarities, which Samael described as the Two Marys in The Perfect Matrimony (see link below). This is the symbol of the two serpents we see in various stories in the Torah (e.g., the serpents of the Pharaoh's sorcerers vs. the serpent of Moses in Exodus 7:8-13, or the poisonous serpents vs. the bronze serpent upon the staff in Numbers 21:6-9). These opposing serpents represent the same force.

That force can be our salvation, but when it is polarized and conditioned through desire or identification with sensation (or, as the Zohar puts it, "comes into contact with matter"), that fire of the Divine Mother becomes a force of destruction, physically and spiritually.

The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner. Whosoever shall fall upon that stone shall be broken; but on whomsoever it shall fall, it will grind him to powder. -- Luke 20:17-18


So when God says, "I will no longer curse the ground for man's sake," that indicates that the initiate who has completed the work of Noah has been freed from the destructive polarity of the fire of the Divine Mother.
7 months ago
·
#26986
Accepted Answer
The verse you cited (Genesis 8:21) is from the story of Noah and the Ark. To understand this story, you need to view it as a symbolic representation of elements of the Path, not a story about a man in a boat with animals. Otherwise, you will encounter many apparent contradictions (not just the one you cited).

We have two lectures on this site, called "The Ark of Noah" that elaborates the symbolism of this story. I have linked them below, and suggest you study them if you want to learn more.

Now, with respect to the specific verse that you cited, it occurs after Noah has disembarked from the Ark and sacrificed the animals (i.e., he had already built the solar bodies and was in the process of eliminating his animal ego).

That is the context for that verse. So when the Lord says, "I will not again curse the ground," the "ground" is not the physical earth, but rather refers to Noah specifically (or better said, any initiate who performs the work of Noah).

Now let us see what the Zohar has to say about this verse:

Said Rabbi Hezekiah: "It is written, 'And the Lord said in his heart, I will not again curse the ground any more for man's sake' (Gen. VIII. 21). What do these words mean?"

Said Rabbi Jose: "I have heard Rabbi Simeon say, 'When fire from heaven is intense and comes into contact with matter, it produces a thick smoke that is exceedingly harmful to the world; and the more its heat falls on mankind the more injurious it is to them, on account of the smoke sent forth by which they are suffocated and destroyed. But, when it is moderate and not in excess, it is no longer a destructive agent.' The meaning of the words to asiph (will not again) is, 'I will not augment the heat that I send unto the world below and which on coming into contact with the matter of the earth gives rise to smoke that is deleterious and destructive to life.'"


The fire from heaven is the force of Binah, the Holy Spirit, or the Divine Mother. That force has two polarities, which Samael described as the Two Marys in The Perfect Matrimony (see link below). This is the symbol of the two serpents we see in various stories in the Torah (e.g., the serpents of the Pharaoh's sorcerers vs. the serpent of Moses in Exodus 7:8-13, or the poisonous serpents vs. the bronze serpent upon the staff in Numbers 21:6-9). These opposing serpents represent the same force.

That force can be our salvation, but when it is polarized and conditioned through desire or identification with sensation (or, as the Zohar puts it, "comes into contact with matter"), that fire of the Divine Mother becomes a force of destruction, physically and spiritually.

The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner. Whosoever shall fall upon that stone shall be broken; but on whomsoever it shall fall, it will grind him to powder. -- Luke 20:17-18


So when God says, "I will no longer curse the ground for man's sake," that indicates that the initiate who has completed the work of Noah has been freed from the destructive polarity of the fire of the Divine Mother.
Jon Creese selected the reply #26986 as the answer for this post — 7 months ago
7 months ago
·
#27004
Thank you, Nicodemus. I greatly appreciate the detailed response and additional information.
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