Monday, 15 February 2021
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If the Innermost must pay karma because it allowed its human soul to fail, what is to be said for the karma of Divinity as a whole, allowing an entire race to fail?
1 year ago
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#24150
Accepted Answer
Many gods suffer because they cannot enter the Absolute due to serious karmic commitments, whether for good or for evil.

One needs to be prepared within the region of Atala before entering into the Absolute. In Atala, the Beings are uncolored. A certain man who could not enter into the Absolute lives there, due to the fact that he invented the two words “good” and “evil” instead of using the words evolutionary and devolutionary. This man created a type of Karma because humanity has been damaged with the two words “good” and “evil.” In everything, we say, “this is good,” or “this is evil,” so humanity is stagnant in all of that which attracts them to the studies of internal values. This is why this holy man is waiting. —Samael Aun Weor, Tarot and Kabbalah: “The Ain”
Archangel Sakaki is one example of a master who must suffer the consequences of his mistake. However, the gods even suffer due to good.
The saints, the angels, are not free of karma. The gods are still subject to the law of karma. They act and there are consequences, and sometimes the consequences are suffering. We know the case of the angel Sakaki. We know cases of masters who made mistakes, who, even by doing something purely good, had to bear the consequences of that goodness.

This gets into subtle regions of philosophy where you have to understand the three gunas, which in brief are three modifications of Christ at the root of nature. Those gunas are goodness, impurity, and ignorance, or in Sanskrit: Sattva, Rajas, and Tamas. They are three conditions of energy and matter. If those three are out of balance with one another, there is existence. That is, a saint who has done a lot of good (who is very Sattvic) cannot enter the Absolute because the universe owes them. Only when a being has reached the level of not owing and not being owed, and has perfect knowledge, meaning no ignorance, that entrance into the Absolute occurs. Below that are always consequences, and we enter into what is suffering and what is not suffering, and that is a complicated question. Mere existence is a form of suffering, so even the goodness of a great saint causes karma to exist, which is a condition of existence, which is a condition of suffering, thus even the saints are a cause of suffering. I don’t know if you can follow that; philosophically, it is pretty subtle. —Christ, Mantra, Mind Protection

For thirty years I sought God. But when I looked carefully I found that in reality God was the seeker and I the sought. -Bayazid al-Bastami

1 year ago
·
#24150
Accepted Answer
Many gods suffer because they cannot enter the Absolute due to serious karmic commitments, whether for good or for evil.

One needs to be prepared within the region of Atala before entering into the Absolute. In Atala, the Beings are uncolored. A certain man who could not enter into the Absolute lives there, due to the fact that he invented the two words “good” and “evil” instead of using the words evolutionary and devolutionary. This man created a type of Karma because humanity has been damaged with the two words “good” and “evil.” In everything, we say, “this is good,” or “this is evil,” so humanity is stagnant in all of that which attracts them to the studies of internal values. This is why this holy man is waiting. —Samael Aun Weor, Tarot and Kabbalah: “The Ain”
Archangel Sakaki is one example of a master who must suffer the consequences of his mistake. However, the gods even suffer due to good.
The saints, the angels, are not free of karma. The gods are still subject to the law of karma. They act and there are consequences, and sometimes the consequences are suffering. We know the case of the angel Sakaki. We know cases of masters who made mistakes, who, even by doing something purely good, had to bear the consequences of that goodness.

This gets into subtle regions of philosophy where you have to understand the three gunas, which in brief are three modifications of Christ at the root of nature. Those gunas are goodness, impurity, and ignorance, or in Sanskrit: Sattva, Rajas, and Tamas. They are three conditions of energy and matter. If those three are out of balance with one another, there is existence. That is, a saint who has done a lot of good (who is very Sattvic) cannot enter the Absolute because the universe owes them. Only when a being has reached the level of not owing and not being owed, and has perfect knowledge, meaning no ignorance, that entrance into the Absolute occurs. Below that are always consequences, and we enter into what is suffering and what is not suffering, and that is a complicated question. Mere existence is a form of suffering, so even the goodness of a great saint causes karma to exist, which is a condition of existence, which is a condition of suffering, thus even the saints are a cause of suffering. I don’t know if you can follow that; philosophically, it is pretty subtle. —Christ, Mantra, Mind Protection

For thirty years I sought God. But when I looked carefully I found that in reality God was the seeker and I the sought. -Bayazid al-Bastami

If you want to incarnate Christ, you must obtain the characteristics of a lemon. - Samael Aun Weor
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