Saturday, 16 May 2020
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Please forgive me for any ignorance I may speak, I am just a beginner seeking help from those with experience.

It was thanks to Dzogchen teachings and terminology that pulled me towards gnosis and Samaels teachings when I first saw them. Then, it was thanks to Samael and the instructors on this site for helping me understand Dzogchen teachings in a more synthesised way. Although Dzogchen and Gnosis are very similar in their applications of awareness and meditation, there is still some things that I would like some help with in understanding.

Rigpa: In Dzogchen, rigpa is often seen and described as this exalted state of mind that’s difficult to reach. Rigpa, resting in pristine awareness or Darmakaya/Kether and while from that perspective you perceive all of samsara as displays of darmakaya and dharmadhatu. All thoughts that arise are dissolved or liberated from the perspective of pristine awareness.
In gnosis Rigpa is seen as the natural state of mind that can reflect imagery, insight and wisdom of the being. Thoughts come and go but it doesn’t mean the cause of them (ego) is dissolved.
Therefore are the meanings of Rigpa different or is there something I am missing?

Realization: In Dzogchen it seems that when they reach the state of cutting through to pristine awareness, Rigpa, via non meditation, if one has achieved this they are considered a fully enlightened Vidyadhara who is self realised and liberated. Now, in Gnosis it is said to reach liberation and self realisation one needs more than just an experience, one needs to be married, awaken the kundalini, to die and walk the path of initiation which is a difficult path. Could you please help me see the correlation? It seems they are either not aware or are missing information while teaching people in the west.
2 years ago
·
#21995
Accepted Answer
"“For in its intrinsic awareness, the three Buddha-bodies are inseparable, and fully present as one.

Its emptiness and utter lack of inherit existence is the buddha-body of reality (Kether).

“The natural resonance and radiance of this emptiness is the buddha-body of perfect resource (Chokmah).

“And its unimpeded arising in any form whatsoever is the buddha-body of emanation (Binah).

“These three, fully present as one, are the very essence of awareness itself." —The Tibetan Book of the Dead
To perceive from the light of Kether within samadhi does not signify that we have reached complete perfection and enlightenment.

There are two forms of enlightenment: temporary and permanent.

Many accomplished Buddhists and yogis know how to reach Dharmakaya (Kether) in meditation, yet without dissolving the ego. This is temporary enlightenment.

Permanent liberation is achieved after annihilating the ego on the Second Mountain and after reaching the Absolute upon the Third Mountain.

When thoughts dissipate within Rigpa, this signifies a clarified, heightened, and awakened state. However, to be permanently established in Kether is a high work predicated upon the complete death of the ego and the full payment of one's karma.

One only permanently reaches Kether (Dharmakaya) upon the Third Mountain, and even then one must enter the Absolute, to dissolve as a drop within the ocean of Uncreated Light.

For thirty years I sought God. But when I looked carefully I found that in reality God was the seeker and I the sought. -Bayazid al-Bastami

2 years ago
·
#21995
Accepted Answer
"“For in its intrinsic awareness, the three Buddha-bodies are inseparable, and fully present as one.

Its emptiness and utter lack of inherit existence is the buddha-body of reality (Kether).

“The natural resonance and radiance of this emptiness is the buddha-body of perfect resource (Chokmah).

“And its unimpeded arising in any form whatsoever is the buddha-body of emanation (Binah).

“These three, fully present as one, are the very essence of awareness itself." —The Tibetan Book of the Dead
To perceive from the light of Kether within samadhi does not signify that we have reached complete perfection and enlightenment.

There are two forms of enlightenment: temporary and permanent.

Many accomplished Buddhists and yogis know how to reach Dharmakaya (Kether) in meditation, yet without dissolving the ego. This is temporary enlightenment.

Permanent liberation is achieved after annihilating the ego on the Second Mountain and after reaching the Absolute upon the Third Mountain.

When thoughts dissipate within Rigpa, this signifies a clarified, heightened, and awakened state. However, to be permanently established in Kether is a high work predicated upon the complete death of the ego and the full payment of one's karma.

One only permanently reaches Kether (Dharmakaya) upon the Third Mountain, and even then one must enter the Absolute, to dissolve as a drop within the ocean of Uncreated Light.

For thirty years I sought God. But when I looked carefully I found that in reality God was the seeker and I the sought. -Bayazid al-Bastami

2 years ago
·
#22003
Thank you again Almustafa for not only your kindness but your absolute preciseness in answering my question, you have successfully cleared up my ignorance thank you! :)
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