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  Monday, 02 January 2017
  5 Replies
  1K Visits
Greetings,

Can you please tell me what do this words mean?
What is Hare? What is Ram? What about Mage, Prage Yodi etc? :)
So as to not learn them by heart without knowing what i am learning.

Thank you!

Mantras for Astral Projection:
Hare Ram. Hare Ram, Ram Hare Hare. Hare Christ, Hare Christ, Christ, Christ, Hare, Hare.
Hare Murare Modup Coiptus Hare Copal Govind Mukum Sonre.
Mage Prage Yodi Kolpi Basi Parvot Tullo Hiro No Dane En Bai de Nem.
Sri Govind, Sri Govind. Sri Govind. Sri Govind. Ganesha Namap.

http://gnosticteachings.org/books-by-samael-aun-weor/the-perfect-matrimony/958-the-divine-trinity.html
7 years ago
·
#13315
Accepted Answer
Being mantras, these words do not translate directly to english. The first portion is mostly names for the radiant light some call Christ, Krishna, etc., such as "Hare Ram."

The whole prayer was quoted from a book from India, transliterated through several languages, and who knows how many versions. Plus, at that time publishing was done by hand by people who did not know mantras, sanskrit, etc. Therefore, in this mantra there are typographical errors, but we have not yet found a copy of the original book to confirm how it was written there. As an example of the typos we suspect, the passage "Hare Copal Govind" is probably "hare gopal govind." A small difference, but more accurate to sanskrit. These kinds of typos are very widespread in the Spanish editions of the books, since most of the publishers have not noticed them. The prayer does work as written, but if you are not comfortable using it, there are plenty of other mantras and prayers you can use.

“Nothing is easier than self-deceit. For what each man wishes, that he also believes.” —Demosthenes

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." —Samael Aun Weor

7 years ago
·
#13315
Accepted Answer
Being mantras, these words do not translate directly to english. The first portion is mostly names for the radiant light some call Christ, Krishna, etc., such as "Hare Ram."

The whole prayer was quoted from a book from India, transliterated through several languages, and who knows how many versions. Plus, at that time publishing was done by hand by people who did not know mantras, sanskrit, etc. Therefore, in this mantra there are typographical errors, but we have not yet found a copy of the original book to confirm how it was written there. As an example of the typos we suspect, the passage "Hare Copal Govind" is probably "hare gopal govind." A small difference, but more accurate to sanskrit. These kinds of typos are very widespread in the Spanish editions of the books, since most of the publishers have not noticed them. The prayer does work as written, but if you are not comfortable using it, there are plenty of other mantras and prayers you can use.

“Nothing is easier than self-deceit. For what each man wishes, that he also believes.” —Demosthenes

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." —Samael Aun Weor

7 years ago
·
#13318
Thank you.
10 months ago
·
#29674
Is there any way to hear audio to make sure I am pronouncing it as close as possible? Thanks!
10 months ago
·
#29678
We have discovered the correct Sanskrit for one of the sentences, but not all.

Here is the most up to date version, corrected by Glorian:

Hare Ram. Hare Ram, Ram Hare Hare. Hare Christ.

Hare Christ, Christ, Christ, Hare, Hare.

Hare murare madhu kaitabhare gopala govinda mukunda shaure.

Mage Prage Yodi Kolpi Basi Parvot Tullo Hiro No Dane En Bai de Nem.

Sri Govind, Sri Govind, Sri Govind, Sri Govind, Ganesha Namah.


The fourth sentence is uncorrected and we are investigating when we have the opportunity.

When we confirm the remaining words, we will make an audio reference for this mantra.

“Nothing is easier than self-deceit. For what each man wishes, that he also believes.” —Demosthenes

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." —Samael Aun Weor

9 months ago
·
#29724
Mēṁ prage yōdī kolpī basi parvot tullo hiro no dāna en bai de nam.

(મેં પ્રાગે યોદી કોલ્પી બસિ પરવોત ટુલ્લો હીરો નો દાણ એન બાઈ દે નમ).

This is a mantra written in Gujarati.
I couldn't find an English version of the texts in which this mantra is supposed to be actually written, though.

Anyway, this is what I've found:

Literal word-for-word translation: If (mēṁ) in my heart (pragē yōdī kolpī) there is the desire (basis) to achieve perfection (parvot tullo hiro no dāna), may the grace (en) of God (bai de) guide me (nam).

This mantra can be found in the following books:
Bhaktirasbodhini, chapter 1, shloka 1 (written by Vallabhacharya, the founder of the Vallabha Sampradaya);
Bhaktirasamrat, chapter 2, shloka 3 (written by Vitthalnath, the son of Vallabhacharya);
Bhaktirasasudharnava, chapter 1, shloka 2 (written by Gopal Bhatta, a disciple of Vitthalnath).

In all three texts, the mantra is included as part of a devotional prayer. The prayer is directed towards Shri Krishna, the supreme deity of Vaishnavism. The prayer asks Shri Krishna to guide the practitioner on their spiritual journey.
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