Saturday, 17 December 2016
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Hello friends!
When I am using an exclusive concentration practice like japa, do I need to remember that I am meditating as well? I have seen mixed directions on this and I am beginning to realize the difference between just staying concentrated on the mantra itself and then also remembering that I am meditating because it tends to have an effect of taking concentration away from the mantra. I also try to stay as relaxed as possible, settling my shoulders and my thumbs often. This seems necessary but it's a distraction as well.
Lately I need less of this as I am staying more relaxed in these areas as a result of the effort. I remember hearing in one lecture that I should always remember that I am meditating but in another, I think a quote was read from Samuel Aun Weor that we must forget that we are meditating, and I am confused.
My guess would be that as long as I am consentrating solely on the mantra and not allowing my mind to wander, this presence of the moment will allow enough awareness to stay conscious of what I am doing with less and less effort/distractions over time, allowing remembrance of meditation along with undisturbed concentration on mantra? I remember hearing that we should have complete absorption into the mantra or whatever we are concentrating on but with full absorption how will there be any awareness that I am meditating.
Is it through continual awareness practice that I will gain more efficiency in remembrance of meditating while being absorbed in consentration?
Thank you!
5 years ago
·
#13229
Accepted Answer
What we are talking about are basic functions of consciousness:

Awareness: Broad spatial perception
Attention: Focused specific perception
Mindfulness: Recognized continuity
Visualization: Non-physical imagery

For example, once you have learned how to ride a bicycle, you no longer need to think about how to do it. Similarly, it does not require thought to observe or to concentrate. However, after learning to ride the bicycle, the body does the work of riding while the mind immediately wanders away, to daydream. Just so, when meditating, once the attention is placed in concentration, the mind will wander away to daydream, to think, to remember. Therefore, what we seek is to retain mindfulness of what we are doing. Not thinking, not analyzing, but simply being present and aware. So, "ride your bicycle," let your body do what it needs to without thinking "I am pedaling, I am steering."

This non-thinking mindfulness is the entry way to awakening consciousness.

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." - Samael Aun Weor

5 years ago
·
#13220
To be aware of what you are doing is vital. To think of what you are doing is not. That is the difference.

Do not "think" you are meditating. If you are thinking, you are not meditating. If you are not aware of meditating, you are not meditating.

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." - Samael Aun Weor

5 years ago
·
#13224
Okay so "being aware", or "remembering" what I am meditating on is concidered - "not forgetting that I am meditating"?
For example, if I am imagining an apple, as long as I am continually imagining the apple and not drifting off into thoughts, then I am "aware" of what I am doing, correct?
Yes, It seems to be a distraction when I "think" to myself, "I am meditating".
By becoming "absorbed", or "fixed" onto my mantra, or onto the apple, I am automatically "aware" of what I am doing as long as I stay "fixed" on my object of concentration?
I just want to make sure that this is all that I need to spend my effort on, because doing anything else seems to take away from my concentration.
In reality I am supposed to do one thing only, remain "fixed" on my one point of concentration and nothing else. Correct?
5 years ago
·
#13229
Accepted Answer
What we are talking about are basic functions of consciousness:

Awareness: Broad spatial perception
Attention: Focused specific perception
Mindfulness: Recognized continuity
Visualization: Non-physical imagery

For example, once you have learned how to ride a bicycle, you no longer need to think about how to do it. Similarly, it does not require thought to observe or to concentrate. However, after learning to ride the bicycle, the body does the work of riding while the mind immediately wanders away, to daydream. Just so, when meditating, once the attention is placed in concentration, the mind will wander away to daydream, to think, to remember. Therefore, what we seek is to retain mindfulness of what we are doing. Not thinking, not analyzing, but simply being present and aware. So, "ride your bicycle," let your body do what it needs to without thinking "I am pedaling, I am steering."

This non-thinking mindfulness is the entry way to awakening consciousness.

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." - Samael Aun Weor

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