Monday, 12 September 2016
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Dear Instructors:
Some questions popped up in my mind regarding non-exclusive concentration exercises as explained in the course "fuel for spiritual experience", in the section "concentration". I know it is not something to be understood with the intellect, but I want to make sure whatever I understood from it is accurate as far as I can put it into words. Please if you can, respond each one of the questions individually.

1. I do not understand the confusion people make regarding the sense of separation of an exclusive concentration, versus the non-separation of a non-exclusive one. The way I see it, in the non-exclusive technique, you pay attention to everything. Maybe the word to use here would be "aware of everything", because the way we direct the light of our consciousness. Anyways if that is so, regarding the practice, there is only two things in the entire universe: the observer and everything else. There is no place for dualism if there is only one (complex) object to observe. So I don't understand why would someone even try to force a further sense of separation between the Self and the ego. If a thought that says "here is my ego" or "here is my superior being" takes place, I just observe these thoughts and that's it. Separation just exists there, it should not be made into existence. It is said that this technique is hard to get with the intellect, so the simplicity of my thinking here brings me doubts about its correctness. So, am I in the ballpark here?

2. As far as I see, my only task during this practice is not becoming identified with the thoughts. The part of extracting information from each thought comes through passive observing and then inspiration and intuition does the rest. Is that accurate?

3. After doing this practice, I feel that I developed a power of awareness in my daily life that I did not have before. The lecturer says that self remembrance and concentration would be a pre-requisite to the practice. Could the opposite also be true?

4. If the practice does not exclude anything that comes to mind, does it also include physical sensations and emotions?

5. If the answer to the previous question is yes, why bother with proper posture or even relaxation? If a thought form comes to mind related with tension or discomfort, why not observe them and let them pass like the rest of the thoughts and let relaxation occur naturally?

6. During the non-exclusive practice, if my thumb itches for example, should I just observe the sensation of itch and see it passing along with the train of thoughts, or act on it and observe the pattern of action and reaction? Shouldn't the very dualism of action and reaction be understood as just another impermanent thought form to be observed?

7. Related to the previous question, could I expand on the concept and assume that our daily routine should be some sort of extension to this practice, just with more types of impressions coming to mind related to the activities we are doing, human interactions, etc... Just observe all thoughts, emotions and actions and inquire about its origins as much as our intuition is capable?

8. Some lectures in this site mention that our awareness in our daily lives should include our being, other lectures mentions the task at hand, our breath, the mantra "om", etc. Should we really make an effort to include all of this in our awareness? Isn't it too much exertion? Or should I include just some of them for different results? Does it help to practice non-exclusive concentration?
6 years ago
·
#12594
Accepted Answer
All of these answers correspond to the non-exclusive concentration technique:

1. Intellectually, this is so. However, emotionally, the experience is quite different. Then, further on, the experience becomes even more difficult. When the consciousness is not filtered by the four bodies of sin, the perception of unity terrifies the ego. To move beyond this is something profound and extraordinarily difficult.

2. At first, but as you see in #1, thoughts are the most superficial obstacle.

3. They are reciprocal. Yet, the seed that begins it is activation of consciousness, ie. concentration, self-observation, awareness of perception. Someone who has no concentration or awareness simply cannot do this.

4. One observes what is, yet withdraws from perceptions into the act of observation itself, so that what is perceived becomes abstracted. This is called "pratyahara."

5. Because when that state is entered, posture has incredible importance. If your posture or relaxation is poor, your progress will be limited or even blocked entirely. The body will be a serious impediment. That is why it is necessary to train it from the beginning, and avoid creating bad habits with the body.

6. One should simply remain watchful and aware, not focusing on the specific sensation, but retaining comprehensive awareness. If you are focusing on the sensation, then you are not practicing non-exclusive concentration.

7. In non-exclusive concentration, one only observes. One does not inquire, analyze, seek, intuit, or explain.

8. Again, in non-exclusive concentration one seeks only to expand awareness continually, to be aware of all things at all times. Naturally, this must also include the non-physical. And yes, it requires A LOT OF ENERGY. That is why few people can succeed in this approach.

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." - Samael Aun Weor

6 years ago
·
#12594
Accepted Answer
All of these answers correspond to the non-exclusive concentration technique:

1. Intellectually, this is so. However, emotionally, the experience is quite different. Then, further on, the experience becomes even more difficult. When the consciousness is not filtered by the four bodies of sin, the perception of unity terrifies the ego. To move beyond this is something profound and extraordinarily difficult.

2. At first, but as you see in #1, thoughts are the most superficial obstacle.

3. They are reciprocal. Yet, the seed that begins it is activation of consciousness, ie. concentration, self-observation, awareness of perception. Someone who has no concentration or awareness simply cannot do this.

4. One observes what is, yet withdraws from perceptions into the act of observation itself, so that what is perceived becomes abstracted. This is called "pratyahara."

5. Because when that state is entered, posture has incredible importance. If your posture or relaxation is poor, your progress will be limited or even blocked entirely. The body will be a serious impediment. That is why it is necessary to train it from the beginning, and avoid creating bad habits with the body.

6. One should simply remain watchful and aware, not focusing on the specific sensation, but retaining comprehensive awareness. If you are focusing on the sensation, then you are not practicing non-exclusive concentration.

7. In non-exclusive concentration, one only observes. One does not inquire, analyze, seek, intuit, or explain.

8. Again, in non-exclusive concentration one seeks only to expand awareness continually, to be aware of all things at all times. Naturally, this must also include the non-physical. And yes, it requires A LOT OF ENERGY. That is why few people can succeed in this approach.

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." - Samael Aun Weor

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